SGP Marina Bay Italian Food

Nothing can match the unique taste of authentic Italian cuisine in Marina Bay. For the people who are having it for the first time or the people who enjoy the dishes regularly, they would find a connection to the richness of Italian food, if the food made well. If not properly made, they can also tell the difference in the taste of the food and just by their appearance.

To make Italian food from scratch and making it good can be a daunting task for any newcomers and old veterans in Marina Bay. The newcomers don’t want to ruin the dishes, and the veterans want to stick true to the authentic taste that the dish offers. One of the unique things, if not, the most important unique thing, about Italian dishes are the carefully selected ingredients that go into making one. Every ingredient in an Italian dish is carefully examined to know the true nature of the ingredients, where it lacks flavor, what other ingredients can fill up that space with its own flavor.

It is the job of an Italian chef in Marina Bay to know all of these things beforehand to execute in the kitchen without any mistake. Ingredients such as Olive oil, it gets used in Italian food all the time. It adds the authenticate taste of an Italian dish and also by being healthy to consume. There is a saying that cooking with ingredients that are taken from the same region will result in a better taste.

Italian Cuisine - Cooking in Italy

Garlic, pasta, tomatoes, basil add the true nature of an Italian dish to the surface. What is so fascinating about these ingredients, that they are very common, and on the right hand they can bring more to the dish than thousands of rare material combined. A clove of garlic will bring all the hidden flavors from the dish, but can’t say the same thing to jarred garlic. Tomatoes, nearly every pizza, and spaghetti ever made on this planet have used tomatoes in one way or another. Basil, is another iconic ingredient in making Margherita pizza. There is a reason why the word basil is synonymous with King of herbs.

Italian Vegetable Side Dishes Giada

Another widely used ingredient in the Italian dishes are Rosemary, basil may be called King of herbs, but rosemary is known to be the queen. Rosemary really shines in a perfectly made risotto.

No Italian dish in Marina Bay would complete without the inclusion of wine. Wine in an Italian culture takes a significant role in making the cuisines and adds many more flavors to the dish. The wine gets used in the Italian dish is drinking wines, not cooking ones. If any ingredient doesn’t bring its own flavor then it is better left alone. Adding wine to a dish has long been a cultural identity for the Italians. If the wine isn’t fit to drink, then it would be no use in the making of an Italian dish, if used, then it wouldn’t be a genuine Italian product.

Italian cuisine has a huge variety of dishes and drinks: because Italy was not officially unified until 1861, and its cuisines reflect the cultural variety of its regions and its diverse history (with influences from Greek, Roman, Gaelic, Germanic, Goth, Norman, Lombard, Frank, Turkish, Hebrew, Slavic, Arabic and Chinese cuisines). Italian cuisine is savored in every corner of the world.

In a way, there is really no such thing as Italian cuisine in the way that people usually understand national cuisines. Each region has its own specialties. Italian cuisine is not only highly regionalized, it is also very seasonal. The high priority placed on the use of fresh, seasonal produce distinguishes the Italian cuisine from imitations available in most other countries.

Regional differences

Roman cuisine, for instance, uses a lot of pecorino (cheese made from sheep's milk) and offal, while Tuscan cuisine includes white beans, meat, and bread. Pizza making also varies throughout the country, the pizza crusts in Rome are thin and crispy, while Neapolitan pizza and Sicilian pizza have a thicker crust. The influence of Northern Italian cuisine can be seen in French and German cuisines. Piedmont and Lombardy each grow their own different kinds of rice, which are used to make risotto. The North of Italy is the home of polenta. Emilia-Romagna is known for lasagna and tortellini (stuffed pasta), Naples (Napoli) is the home of pizza, mozzarella cheese and pastries. Calabria's cuisine uses a lot of hot pepper in its renowned salami (which is common, in several varieties, throughout the country) and uses capsicum. Sicily is the home of ice cream but its cuisine also has many influences from Arab cuisine (lemon, pistachio) and also includes fish (tuna, swordfish). Sardinia is famous for lamb and pecorino.

Northern and Southern Italian cooking

Traditional Italian cuisine varies from region to region and does not follow North-South tendencies. Northern and southern Italian cuisines can be differentiated, primarily, by the north using more butters and creams and the south more tomato and olive oil. Generally, however, there is a strong difference between the regional use of cooking fat and traditional style of pasta. Inland northern and northeastern regions usually prefer more butter, cream, polenta, mascarpone, grana padano, and parmigian cheeses, risotto, lasagna and fresh egg pasta. Coastal northern and central regions are more of a link between north and south and often use tortellini, ravioli and are known for great prosciutto. The southern regions are known for mozzarella, caciocavallo, and pecorino cheeses, olive oil, and dried pasta. Southern Italian cuisine also uses the ubiquitous tomato.

Types of Italian coffee

Italian coffee (caffè), also known as espresso, which is a strong coffee prepared by forcing the hot water through finely ground coffee beans at high pressure. It is usually served in relatively small amount. Caffè macchiato is covered with a bit of steamed milk or whip cream; caffè ristretto is made with less water, and is stronger. Cappuccino is mixed or topped with steamed, mostly foamy, milk. It is generally considered a morning drink. Caffelatte is usually equal parts of espresso and steamed milk, like café au lait, and is typically served in a large cup. Latte macchiato (spotted milk) is a glass of warm milk with a bit of coffee.

Italian wines

We cannot talk about Italian food without talking about Italian wine. Most Italian wines of great names are produced in the three main Italian regions: Piedmont (Barolo), Venetia (Amarone, Pinot Grigio, etc.) and Tuscany (Chianti, Brunello). Other great wine producing regions such as Puglie (Primitivo) and Sicily also produce some noteworthy wines.

Traditional Menu

A traditional Italian meal:

1. Antipasto - hot or cold appetizers

2. Primo ("first course"), usually consists of a hot dish like pasta, risotto, gnocchi, polenta or soup. There are usually many vegetarian options.

3. Secondo ("second course"), the main dish, usually fish or meat (pasta is never the main course of a meal). Traditionally veal is the most widely used meat, at least in the North, although beef has become more popular since World War II.

4. Contorno ("side dish") may consist of a salad or vegetables. A traditional menu features salad after the main course.

5. Dolce ("dessert")

6. Caffè ("coffee") (espresso)

7. Digestive which consists of liquors/liqueurs (grappa, amaro, limoncello) sometimes called ammazzacaffè ("Coffee killer")

Although it is said that today the traditional Italian menu is reserved for special events even as the common menu only includes the first and second course, the side dish (often joined to the second course) and coffee (if not in a hurry). One remarkable aspect of an Italian meal, especially if eaten in an Italian home, is that the primo, or first course, is usually the more substantial dish, containing most of the meal's carbohydrates, and will consist of risotto or pasta. Modern Italian cuisine also includes single courses (all-at-once courses), providing carbs and proteins altogether (e.g. pasta and vegetables).

Cooking with these ingredients in a perfectly well manner style to bring out the richness of the ingredient is like learning a new language by normal interaction. The more you interact with others, the more you will get better at speaking. The same method can be applied here, learning Italian cuisine is a lot like learning a new language. And each ingredient becomes the grammar and the vocabulary for your final dish, which can be seen as a sentence in this metaphor.

Simple Traditional Italian Dishes For Christmas

The first thing to do before starting to cook with the ingredients you have is to limit them. Almost all Italian dishes use a finite amount of ingredients to make the dish, overloading with unnecessary spices will put out the subtle taste of the natural ingredients. Learning the value of each of the ingredients will help you know their weaknesses and strength, finding a better ingredient to fill the weakness of another is the step to become a great Italian restaurant in Marina Bay.

Italian Spaghetti Pie With Ricotta

The second thing to do is to make sure every ingredient in the pantry is fresh and well-seasoned. This process really helps to bring the dish closer to the authentic Italian dish that we know and love.

When cooking pasta, make sure to leave it a little undercooked, so the pasta can still have the bite factor. Otherwise, everything on the plate would be soggy and wet. Frequent tasting the pasta before serving will help you get to know the dish better and understand the time management of the sogginess of the pasta.

Italian Cuisine is much more regional and varied than many people imagine. It is easy to think that some pasta, some marinara sauce, a crust of Italian bread and a glass of wine is the beginning and end of Italian cuisine, especially if you grew up in the United States.

There is much more than red sauce and starch on the agenda for most Italian regional cuisines, and with all of the various regions and cultures in the boot on the ocean. Form the snow capped north to the sun drenched islands of the Mediterranean; Italian cuisine is as varied as the landscape.

Tuscany is one of the gems of northern Italy and thousands of tourist's flock to this beautiful region every year. Tuscany is sought out for its simple but delicious dishes, seasoned sparingly with basil, parsley, and thyme. Tuscan bread and a little bit of olive oil are a big part of the seafood dishes of the Tuscan region.

Abruzzo, a little known treasure in the Middle Eastern section of the boot mixes chili peppers into almost all of their dishes. Like many other regions in Italy, there is a mixture of mountain and seafood dishes. Although pasta is usually a main dish in many countries, in this and many regions of Italy it is as likely to be served as an hors dourves.

Most of the chefs in the Abruzzo region are skilled at hand rolling their own stuffed pastas, and crepes are used in meat dishes, rolled in savory sauces or put in to broths. Polenta is as prevalent in this part of Italy as pasta and the local sausages are some of the best you will come across.

Sardinia is home to a diverse cuisine and their island roots are reflected in their love of all things seafood. This, in addition to a rich heritage of not only Italians, but also Arabs, French, Greeks, and Spaniards, has made the island home to a diverse culture of seafood and meat dishes spiced with fennel and saffron. The Sardinians have a number of specialist cheeses based on sheep's rather than cows milk and a penchant for good solid home cooking, such as stews, that give the local cuisine a wonderful richness.

Emilia-Romagna although not a name that springs to mind when you are discussing Italy, has perhaps the finest regional cuisine in the country. It is often called the market basket of Italy. Located in northern Italy, Emilia-Romagna is home to many of Italy's most renowned dishes, like Prosciutto di Parma, Mortadella, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and balsamic vinegar. Highly spiced food and a more stylish presentation are the hallmarks of this wonderful part of Italy.

The Italian cuisine that we are used to eating abroad is only the tip of the iceberg and it is well worth exploring in depth the styles and variations of Italian regional cuisine. The style of the food is very often influenced by its proximity to other areas such as Northern Africa and other Mediterranean and European countries. All of these places have deeply affected Italian regional cuisines.

Shepard's, shopkeepers, farmers, and fisherman all contribute to one of the most diverse cultural cuisines in the world. . When you next go out for Italian food try and see if you can find something a little more regional than the ubiquitous pasta and pizza, who knows it could be the start of a real passion for Italian regional cuisine.

You can follow all the rules in the textbook to create a perfect Italian dish but you won’t reach the final stage of an Italian dish without putting your heart in it. It is never about pleasing the crowd with Italian dishes, it has always been sticking to the original recipe, you can have all the ingredients but it won’t be complete without putting the heart and soul in cooking. Knowing who you are cooking for, what do they like the most, then creating the dish made especially for them will taste better.

Italian Food - An Overview Of World's Best Flavor

Italian Oven Roasted Vegetables

Croatia is fast becoming a popular and a must-see destination for most people. From the beautiful Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean weather, The Dinaric Alps, spectacular beaches, incredible national parks, ancient walled towns to the friendly locals there are many reasons why you should fall in love with Croatia. The following are 5 reasons you should fall in love with Croatia.

1. Nature.

From the stunning clear turquoise-blue water of Adriatic Sea to the incredibly preserved nature there is a lot that Croatia can offer to the nature lovers. Croatia boasts some of the most beautiful and expansive 8 National and 11 Nature Parks among which are the most popular Plitvice lakes. Besides, there are over 1000 islands, islets, and reefs along the Croatian Coast. It’s ideal country for sailing and island hopping. Beaches in Croatia are countless and some of them are considered the most beautiful in the world. Like pebble beach called Zlatni Rat (Golden Cape) on island Brac which changes its peak left or right according to the wind and sea current.

2. Culture.

Croatia’s rich cultural heritage can be discovered within the many galleries, museums, churches speared throughout the country. Visitors can also discover the rich cultural heritage in diverse musical, film, dance, theatre festivals and other cultural events that take place all year round. Some of the Croatian cultural sites on the World Heritage list include; the Historic City of Trogir, The Cathedral of St. James in Sibenik, Euphrasian Basilica in Porec, Hvar’s Stari Grad Plain, and The Old City of Dubrovnik.

The rich history in Croatia has been passed through generations to date. Some aspects of the past that have been preserved over time make up a significant part of Croatia's culture. These include the authentic food, traditions and welcoming nature of the natives. There are also important events that make up their culture like Sinjska Alka. This is an event that has been held annually since 1717 and it involves men competing on horses trying to run a lance through a metal ring- Alka. Points on this competition are awarded depending on where their lance hit the Alka.

3. History.

Croatia is rich in history- both modern and ancient. Its ancient history is among the oldest in the world. The Hvar Island, for example, is home to one of the oldest theatres in the world called Hvar Theatre that was built in 1612 as well as Fortress Formica. The Fortress Formica was built in the 16th century. The Walls of Dubrovnik were considered one of the best fortification systems of Middle Ages. There are many more historical sites in Croatia including Diocletian’s Palace in Split, well-preserved Amphitheater in Pula, Brijuni National Park where you can get to see the dinosaur footprints and Roman and Byzantine ruins that have managed to stand the test of time.

4. Food and wine.

The Croatian food is indeed excellent and is served with a variety of Croatian wine. The cuisine varies from one city to another, but there are traditional recipes that are found throughout the country. From the meat dishes and delicious stews that are common in the inland regions to the seafood prepared with Croatian olive oil found along the coast, be sure to get a variety of fresh and delicious meals. Different delicious traditional Croatian cuisine and wine that you should taste include; Plavac Mali red wine, and Posip white wine, black risotto, Pasticada and homemade pasta with cream and sprinkled truffles is a must taste. These dishes have been influenced by different cultures including Italian, Hungarian, Turkish and Austrian influences.

5. Weather.

The climate in Croatia can be divided into continental (cold winters and hot summers) and Mediterranean (cool, rainy winters and hot summers). When thinking of the best time for having a vacation you can choose from April until September depending on whether you like springtime and offseason, or summer time and top season. Keep in mind that for swimming and sunbathing the best months are from July until September. This makes Croatia an excellent place to visit throughout the year. Buying property in Croatia is, therefore, a lucrative venture if you want to live in this area as well as an investment to target the high number of people flocking into this country.

Once you visit Croatia, you will fall in love and never want to leave!

Rushing the stages of cooking is a bad way to cook Italian food. Cooking something good takes time, if not, the dish would come off under cooked and as the dish wouldn’t have much time to fully utilize all the ingredients in it. The end result would not match the standard quality. It is recommended to savor the moment because Italian dishes are more than just average fast food.

There is a rigorous process must be followed to create a perfect Italian dish. The addition of any new ingredients might spoil the genuineness of the dish. Italian cuisines leave much more than just a taste, they offer the traditional food aroma, the very quality of taste of the ingredients, and just by being healthy. Since there is no inclusion of any chemicals to appeal to a larger audience, the food can far away from reaching for the fast-food processed taste. Authenticity adds much more value to Italian food than just being another thing to eat while hungry.

Italian cuisine has an excellent reputation, and the country's food is known throughout the world. While Italy is perhaps best known for pasta and pizza, there are also many excellent Italian meat and seafood dishes. Additionally, Italy is also of course known for its desserts and cheeses.

For much of its history, Italy was divided into many separate regional states, and with parts of the country being occupied by foreign powers such as France and Italy. Indeed, it was not until 1861 that Italian unification was achieved. As a result of this history, Italian is well-known for its diverse regions, and this diversity is very much reflected in the country's cuisine.

Some dishes from the various regions of Italy include:

* Calabria (the "toe" of Italy) is known for its spicy salami

* Naples is the home of mozzarella and pizza. Additionally, sfogliatelle (Italian filled pastries) originate from the city too.

* Northern Italy produces many excellent foods. Lombardy and Piedmont both produce rice, and this is used in risotto. Other products from northern Italy include balsamic vinegar, bolognese sauce (ragu), lasagna, mortadella (a type of pork sausage served served cold) parmigiano (parmesan cheese), polenta, prosciutto (dry cured ham), and tortellini (stuffed pasta).

* Rome is known for producing a unique style of very thing pizzas. Classically Roman ingredients include pecorino (cheese made from sheep's milk) and offal.

* Sardinia has a reputation for fine lamb meat, and its own variety of pecorino.

* Sicily's proximity to North Africa and the Arab world is reflected in its cusine, most notably in the use of lemon and pestachio. Sicily is also known for its seafood (especially swordfish and tuna), and its desserts, which include gelato icre cream, and granita (a semi-frozen dessert made using water, sugar, and flavorings).

* Tuscany is known for its meat, the use of white beans in its cuisine, and the region's fine unsalted bread.

Slow Cooker Italian Sausage And Pasta